“I decided it was my chance to give a future to my family,” she says. “My art had always been a hobby, but after I had Oliver, I decided it was a chance for me to provide a future for my son and to support my family.”

– Lizette Vieyra

For Lizette Vieyra, life has been an ongoing display of creativity and resilience, in more ways than one. As the founder of craft creations brand Liliz Lu Studio, Lizette creates beautiful pieces of art and jewellery with recycled materials. She gives ‘trash’ a new lease on life, by filling them with colour, experimenting with shapes, and transforming them into unique products that represent Lizette and her Mexican heritage.  

But it isn’t just her artwork that benefits from her creativity and resilience, it is also Lizette and her family. Living in Mexico, Lizette and her husband had been trying for a baby for over three years. So on somewhat of a whim and a glimmer of possibility, they decided to trade in their high-stress life for a new adventure in Australia. “It was a big opportunity for us,” Lizette says. “But it was very hard. I am a woman of action. When I want to do something, I go and I do it. But in Australia, I wanted to do so much, and I couldn’t. My English wasn’t very good, and I felt very constricted in what I was able to do.”

Adding to the challenge was that – as the universe tends to make happen – Liz fell pregnant easily within eight months of arriving in Australia. “I was a new mother and a migrant with limited English in a short space of time. It was very hard,” Lizette says. 

She and her husband also had very little money. But rather than worrying or wallowing, Lizette drew upon that famed creativity and resilience. “I decided it was my chance to give a future to my family,” she says. “My art had always been a hobby, but after I had Oliver, I decided it was a chance for me to provide a future for my son and to support my family.” So Lizette decided to take action.

“I got sticks and flyers and what people would call rubbish, and I started making art,” she says. “I didn’t have any money, but I knew I could make art with anything. Bags from McDonald’s, bottles of coke … A lot of these things are actually inside of my pieces.” 

This initiative is proof of Lizette’s sentiment, that she had, “Just a suitcase full of love, opportunity and dreams,” when arriving in Australia, which she has ultimately made come true. While supporting her family with her crafts, she is also introducing Oliver to hard work that makes his mother happy. 

“I have fallen in love with the multiculturalism of Australia and the country that has welcomed me in sharing my Mexican traditions through my work,” Lizette says. With crafts that are created to a high standard and apply mixed techniques such as papier mache, the range features environmentally-friendly collections like earrings, personalised figures, catrinas (Mexican dolls), alebrijes (Mexican folk sculptures), Mexican hearts and much more, which showcase Mexico’s beautiful traditions and cultures.

“I am so excited to share my culture, and I appreciate it much more now,” says Lizette. “I can also now share my history with my son”

Published by Amy Malpass-Hahn, Freelance writer